Minds that shape the world

My friend Heidi and I were talking about it when she was here a few weeks ago, the weird phenomena here in Iceland where things somehow, almost magically, work out. You bump into someone at a party that is just the person you need to talk to about a project, etc. The anecdotal evidence is overwhelming that these things happen MUCH more often in Iceland than anywhere in the U.S. Heidi and I contemplated whether this had something to do with Iceland's four guardian spirits. I have also considered that maybe all that lysi affects something in the brains of Icelanders, such that they all become partially empathic. Or maybe there is enough left of the old pagan beliefs, where dreams and signs and the other world could intermingle with this world, to let Icelanders understand what is happening around them in a more wholistic  sense. Iceland may also be a small enough society where certain individuals, with enough will power, can wordlessly get things to fall into place for themselves. I do not know for sure, but whatever it is, it is impressive.

Comments

Lissy said…
In fact, I think it is rather possible that all of these things are different ways of explaining the same phenomena, some using neurological science, some using social science, some using psuedo-science.
William said…
In a close knit society there might just be a higher degree of mutual awareness. Iceland falls into that category along with bee colonies. As an example, from the minute bees are able to fly they have the amazing ability to understand their role in the hive, and how to home in on their hive from afar! Not much of a learning curve here, they are born with a sixth sense. Without alot of diversity, their closely knit gene pools may have developed some extraordinary ways to communicate with one another. Can you think of any other species as diverse as humans? This diversity may well be why most of us have have lost this sixth sense.

Popular posts from this blog

Dett í, ofan á, úr, út

Icelandic Provisions

The sky weeps